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2019 Kodiaq RS - Brilliant Silver
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know why this would be happening? Left front tyre heavily worn on the side.
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Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Synthetic rubber
 

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It is likely a wheel alignment issue, especially if you take your car off tarmac.

I made a conscious decision to go with FWD for several reasons. This is one of them.

I would be wary with uneven wear on tyres and Haldex AWD systems. It's also not straightforward in replacing the fronts that are worn; a disparity between the tyres of more than 3mm can trick the system into detecting this as slippage, engages AWD when it doesn't need to be on and causes undue wear to the mechanicals. Early transfer box failures are common as a result. The prevention is replacing all 4 tyres at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Fortunately, there's only 1mm difference. Getting the tyres rotated some time this week. My dealer is registering a brand new Superb 280PS Sportline wagon for me to use.
 

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MoominPapa said:
I would be wary with uneven wear on tyres and Haldex AWD systems. It's also not straightforward in replacing the fronts that are worn; a disparity between the tyres of more than 3mm can trick the system into detecting this as slippage, engages AWD when it doesn't need to be on and causes undue wear to the mechanicals. Early transfer box failures are common as a result.
5th Gen Haldex is proactive, so it's ALWAYS ON at a minimum of 90/10 split when driving and everytime you accelerate it send more torque to the rear (depending on your current speed and acceleration).
The Kodiaq also have a XDS+ (cross EDL) which will brake selected wheels when you corner meaning haldex will have to wary it's operational range to maintain vehicle stability.

The problems you are describing are regarded more for the sub 4th gen units which were reactive and weren't designed for constant operation and even than just 3mm difference wasn't enough to increase slip detection, because the sensors were more crude. I've read somewhere that for the system to detect slip the difference between the wheels must be 100RPM.

In contrast, your car has tyre inflation sensor. If your tyres have uneven wear to the point it can cause any system damage, the tyre inflation system should signal false flat tyre readings before you get any "fake slip", due to it using similar parameters to detect loss in tyre pressure and wheel slip.

Uneven wear can be caused either by:
- car optics -> allign your wheels (maybe wrong allignment at the factory)
- incorect tyre pressure -> increased side tyre wear means low tyre pressure (2 - 2.2 bar is too low and might not be detected by system, pump it to 2.5 to be safe, tyre max pressure is 2.8 - 3.0 for all SUV tyres)

If the problem persists:
- problems with the 4x4 system (GLC is this proven in the extreme, but the system can cause uneven wear even with no tyre-skip so you don't notice it)
 

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This ^^^^

Check pressures, then check geometry (not alignment). You will need somewhere with a Hunter rig and who knows how to use it (so not QuickFit), or preferrably a Beissbarth (as that is what Skoda use).

Only problem is if they find out that the rears need adjusting it is an expensive job as the Front Assist Radar and the Lane Assist camera will need re-calibrating, and only 1 Skoda dealer per region in the UK has the kit to do this. Quite a few VW and Audi dealers have the kit though :)

I doubt you will get this covered under warranty unless you have only had the car a short time, hitting one pothole can put the wheels out of geometry. Then again, if only a small adjustment is needed to the front I would expect the dealer to do this as a gesture of goodwill.
 

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MoominPapa said:
It is likely a wheel alignment issue, especially if you take your car off tarmac.

I made a conscious decision to go with FWD for several reasons. This is one of them.

I would be wary with uneven wear on tyres and Haldex AWD systems. It's also not straightforward in replacing the fronts that are worn; a disparity between the tyres of more than 3mm can trick the system into detecting this as slippage, engages AWD when it doesn't need to be on and causes undue wear to the mechanicals. Early transfer box failures are common as a result. The prevention is replacing all 4 tyres at the same time.
Exactly what happened with my Sorento, even after replacing all tyres. I eventually fitted a switch which allows me isolate the system for normal use.
So i'm concerned about buying the Kodiaq if I'm going to have the same issues. Maybe the latest Haldex system is more sophisticated?
Anyone know?
 
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I've had two Yetis with the Haldex system and the one I've got currently has only 1 mm more wear on the fronts than the rears after 25K. The Haldex isn't fussy about tyre wear differences, and in at least in the Yetis case you can fit a different size wheel as a spare with no dramas.
This is copied from the Haldex bumff....

Enhanced Vehicle Driving Comfort and Transparency
- No wind-up during tight cornering and parking.
- Optimal traction during acceleration.
- No functional problems with tyres having uneven wear, - pressure or size (mini spare).
- No functional problems when towing with one axle lifted. - Transparent actuation.
 

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Hi guys..... I've yet to order my Kodiaq but have been reading all the great forums here.... the better to do battle with the dealer when the time comes.

On the question of tyre wear only on the front left and on the outside only.... I had exactly the same on my Honda CRV. I asked the question of two good local tyre dealers and a local AA patrol guy I know.... and they all came up with the same answer.

Going around roundabouts too often and too fast!

Didn't seem too probable to me at first.... but after a while I figured they could be right. Got a new pair of fronts when the time came... and took it a bit steadier with the roundabout speeds... and without doing any adjustments at all with the geometry.... the problem is largely cured..... just a thought.

So if you live in roundabout country...(such as Milton Keynes).... maybe try the same cure. OR..... I guess you could live on the continent for half the year and balance up the wear that way. :lol:

Thanks again to everyone here for all the great posts and advice. I'll let you know when I've put my order in....
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Dealer said geometry is fine and there's no abnormal wear on the "foot", only on that edge so they could be right. I do take roundabouts a bit quick but definitely not tyre-squealing fast. I'm running the "half load" tyre pressure for R19 - about 2.4 bar
 

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MoominPapa said:
It is likely a wheel alignment issue, especially if you take your car off tarmac.

I made a conscious decision to go with FWD for several reasons. This is one of them.

I would be wary with uneven wear on tyres and Haldex AWD systems. It's also not straightforward in replacing the fronts that are worn; a disparity between the tyres of more than 3mm can trick the system into detecting this as slippage, engages AWD when it doesn't need to be on and causes undue wear to the mechanicals. Early transfer box failures are common as a result. The prevention is replacing all 4 tyres at the same time.
i've gone for FWD, and your comment was a welcome sight. what are your other reasons, please ?
 
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As I said in my post above Haldex themselves say that the latest generations of the Haldex system can cope with uneven tyre wear with no effect, so why listen to rumourmongers.
 
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