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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, before I ordered my car i went on a frenzy of data collection to choose a correct trim that will serve me for years to come, because i'm a creature of habits and i want my car to last for 10 years (200 000 miles). And because i see alot of people having difficulty deciding i want to share my knowledge about Kodiaq.

If i have forgoten about anything or mistaken something, feel free to correct me. I will be mostly talking about diesel engines so if someone has done any research on petrol ones, please add your knowledge to help others.

Engine:
The Kodiaq 1.6 and 2.0 TDI engines are both EA288 EURO6 engines, CR injector setup with solenoid injectors. It's a industry standard so you know it's going to be reliable and was not affected in Europe by the so called Dieselgate scandal because the EURO6 regulations are actualy 50% less strict about NOx emissions than your oversea cousins (not because of enviromental protection, but because US were always anti-diesel).

To keep with the regulations, diesel engines use a 3-step filtering system:

1. EGR valve (Exhaust gas recirculator), which lowers the ammount of oxygen in the combustion chamber with diverting hot and cleaned gases from the exhaust into the combustion chamber. This system will not get "dirty" because it takes gases after the particulates filter so they are not suthy.

2. DPF (Diesel particulates filter), removes any PM10 (partical matter 10 microns and larger) which used to form a black smoke behind diesel cars in the old days. This filter gets automaticly cleaned about every 300miles (500km) in a 10min cycle which use a little bit more fuel than usual. It can be done at any speeds or idling and can be interupted. Just don't get alarmed when your engine revs go a little higher when idling.
EDIT (28.4.2017): IMPORTANT: The best way to keep your DPF clean is to drive on the highway at least once a week for about 30min with your revs above 2500 RPM (normal cruising at 130-150 kp/h)

3. SCR (Selective Catalytic reduction), removes the NOx with injecting purified urea solution (AdBlue) into your catalyst. You need to refill your AdBlue about 10-15k miles depending on your driving style. This is done at the yearly service, but you can do it yourself, due to the filler port next to the fuel port. AdBlue is quite cheat (about 1.5€/L if you don't buy at the dealers) and you will need about 15L/year (15L is the AdBlue tank size on Kodiaq).
EDIT(28.4.2017): IMPORTANT: In 2016, due to AdBlue heater problems after 4 years of car ownership, VW has extended warranty on SCR AdBlue heater to 10 years or 120k miles on certain models of 3.0 and 2.0 TDI engines. Should be a permanent fix by now.

DPF is changed on a big service at 70k miles (100 000 km), the EGR is the weakest link and you will have to replace it at 100-150k miles (200 000km) or in about 10 years if you still have the car.
EDIT(28.4.2017): Above statement is wrong! The DPF filter is a life-time element located behind the engine and WILL NEVER GET REPLACED! Keep your DPF clean with driving on the highways for at least 30min once a week. New filter element costs about 1000€. It's an improved one to the previous EA189 series engine. The engine will do a regenerative cycle, but keeping it cleaner with highway driving is the best way.

The fuel pump is nornaly next to go on diesel engines but newer engines all use a brushless electromotor to drive it so it will last as long as the bearing does (200k miles). DO NOT PUT PETROL IN YOUR DIESEL OR DIRTY DIESEL!!!! This will reduced the lubrecating properties of the fuel pump and can even destroy your injector, if parts of the fuel pump clog them up. It will NOT DAMAGE THE ENGINE due to the small injector tolerances, but will still make you replace the fuel pump, 4 injectors and the fuel rail distributor, which isn't cheap.

The EA288 engine is designed with fuel economy in mind so it has some nifty features:

1. 2 speed oil pump
THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT!!! If you have chosen a manual transmission and have a diesel engine ALWAYS CHANGE GEARS BEFORE 3000 RPM when casualy driving. The oil pump has 2 speeds and a rev sensor that changes into second speed exactly at 3000 RPM. If you constantly shift gears above that you will make the pump switch from 1st to 2nd and back to 1st speed alot and this will decrease your oil pumps lifespan. The DSG transmission is designed at casual driving to always switch before 3000 RPM and this engine was designed for an automatic transmission, but you shouldn't have any problems with a manual, just keep your revs down for everyday driving. This will keep your oil pump healthy.
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2. Shrouded water pump
Due to the diesel engines high thermal efficiency (more energy from fuel goes into work rather than heat than with petrol engine), diesel cars have a hard time warming up in the winter months. VW has improved this with the EA288 and introduced a shroud like cover to the water pump. When your diesel engine is cold (till about 40-50 deg C) and your revs are under 3000 RPM your water pump is shrouded and it does NOT circulate coolant (thermostat fully opens at arround 90 deg C). The benefits of this are lower fuel consumption, less wear on the cold running engine and most importantly you will get hot air into the cabin faster than on regular diesel engines, because while the main water pump is shrouded, the cabin air is heated via a smaller electric pump that diverts the engine heat to the cabin hot air heat exchanger. This shroud is on a spring which maintains it open, so if the electronics fail YOU WON'T LOSE ENGINE COOLING, it will only take you longer to reach normal operating temperature.

This engine has a rubber/nylon (not chain) timing belt which is very quiet and it runs everything, secondary belt runs only your aircon and alternator. The timing belt is a so called lifetime part, due to it being lubrecated with engine oil, because most wear on belts is caused by cracking due to rubber drying out. It still needs to be replaced at 200k miles.

STOP/START function
I have mixed feelings about this function. It can be turned off with a push of a button marked A with an arrow around it, but this is temporary - until you restart your car. Permanently you can choose to turn this function off at your dealers or if you have a VAG diagnostic program.
I'm personaly against this function because:
- an engine start is the most stresful part of the engine operation (even more than reving)
- some parts remain un-lubrecated, because when in motion, metal-on-metal contacts are maintained apart with an oil film, not so when stationary
- starter motors are of a newer design so they will last longer uner this stress, while still less than withouth this function
- it depletes your battery faster, because not only your starter motor drains alot but your aircon, lights and all the gadgets use alot of juice, though the engine will not stop if the battery is low and will recharge it
- it's something to get used to in traffic when you want to "jump in" at a crossroad
- IT HAS BEEN PROVEN TO INCREASE MPG by about 5% overall

Transmission:
All DSG transmissions on Kodiaq (diesel and petrol) are DQ500 wet clutch rated at 600 Nm sealed for life units. This is not the DQ200 dry clutch rated at 200Nm that was VERY PROBLEMATIC at it's launch due to the clutch disc overheating which led to wear. The oil bath keeps the clutch cool even in extreme driving conditions. The DQ500 clutch was used by VW on their Transporter type van for a few years and proved very reliable. Although it's a so called sealed-for-life unit, it still requires oil change at about 70k miles (6 years), it only means that your input is not needed because it will not lose oil so you don't need to check/refill like on some torque convertors. Because the clutches are in oil, they should not wear out before 200k miles.
The gear ration is set to you have 6 normal gears and the 7th is a so called spar-gang (0.574 gear ratio), used only for better fuel economy during cruising. As soon as you will want to accelerate, the transmission shifts into 6th gear. The transmission is a very elegant shifter, if you know how to drive it. Do not brake and than apply full throttle or other way arround, because this confuses the transmission in it's pre-selection and makes the shift a little jerky.

Manual is a standard manual, requires oil change at about 70k miles (6 years) and clutch replacement depending on the driving style (probably 10 years or so). 4th and 5th gears are almost the same with 0,977 and 0,975 gear ratios respectivly with the 6th gear at 0,814 multiplicator.

Thought the DSG and manual have same 1st gear reduction, the final drive ratio is a higher reduction on DSG, meaning the 1st gear on DSG is slower with more torque. This is the opposite in reverse, where DSG is faster with less torque and manual is slower with more torque. It is like this because with manual you don't need to shift from 1st to 2nd so fast and you can fully disengage the clutch in reverse going slower. It's all about making the manual more user and clutch friendly. Just remember to shift before 3000 RPM with manual on normal driving (see oil pump above).

4x4 drive:
There are alot of misconceptions about VW AG 4x4 systems here are the facts:
- Quatro and 4Motion are NOT SYSTEMS they are BRANDS
- all MQB (engine perpendicular) Audi, VW, Seat and Škoda 4x4 cars use Haldex system
- all MLB (engine longitudal) Audi, VW, Seat and Škoda 4x4 cars use Torsen system (though all Škodas are MQB)

Škoda Kodiaq uses a so called Haldex 5th Gen 4x4 split differential. It's an AWD system that transfers 90% of torque to the front and 10% torque to the rear axle in normal driving conditions and it can transfer up to 90% of torque to the rear axle if it encounters slip. It's a pre-emptive system (till 4 Gen it was reactive), which transfers torque depending of throttle position, engine revs, car speed, outside temperature/rain. Torsen can only transfer up to 70% torque to any axle. Haldex improves fuel consumptiones and is more stable during driving because it does not oversteer like the torsen.

Haldex pros:
- fuel efficient
- up to 90% of torque transfer to an axle
- up to 85% torque transfer to a single wheel
- more stability in corners

Haldex cons:
- electronic system
- need to press the off-road function for it to realy kick in - more than 30cm of snow on the road

The biggest and the main downside of Haldex is the electromotor. It uses an electromotor to operate the hydraulic pump of the clutchpack differential lock. This means it doesn't need wheel spin to occur, but all electronics are less durable than purely mechanical systems. The electromotor itself is a brushless one so again it's a very reliable part with only the bearing that can fail (200k miles), but still your system might not function because of a simple thing as a bad fuse. The 5th generation doesn't require an oil filter so the oil change (every 3 years) is not the expensive. IF YOU DO NOT CHANGE YOUR OIL HERE YOU MIGHT LOSE YOUR 4X4 ABILITY. It's the same system as on the Yeti.

Suspension:
There has been much talk about the DCC Adaptive Chassis Control. Should you get it or shouldn't you. I was in the same pickle and did some research. I have found out that DCC actualy doesn't help with the ride comfort in general, it can smooth out the major big bumps a little better than standard suspension but on everyday drive it can be a bit unstable.
The DCC was not originaly designed for ride comfort like the Land Rover or Citroen air suspension, quite the opposite, it was designed to offer a stiff sport like suspension on demand from a mechanical soft suspension. If you want to stiffen your suspension it's a must have, it works great, but if you want to drive on comfort mode or normal it's only a little better than regular suspension in some aspects and a bit worse going arround corners.

So if you perefer stiff suspension of a racing car go for it you can't lose, but if you prefer a more comfortable ride it's more of an interesting tech feature rather than something that you can't do without.

EDITED 28.4.2017
 

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A lot of homework done there Brown-bear!

Yep, the DSG box and Haldex rear axle have clutches immersed in fluid. Wearing surface particles will inevitably contaminate the fluid & filter, and I'm certainly getting mine changed at 40k.

Diesel engines: the discussions rumble on...
I can only speak as I find. My Octavia was in & out of the workshop several times with EGR faults, and smelled like an oily rag when faulty. It was eventually cured in the traditional VW manor of changing the software!
I never fully fell in love with that engine, and have gone back to petrol this time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
KodiaqPetrolHead said:
A lot of homework done there Brown-bear!

Yep, the DSG box and Haldex rear axle have clutches immersed in fluid. Wearing surface particles will inevitably contaminate the fluid & filter, and I'm certainly getting mine changed at 40k.

Diesel engines: the discussions rumble on...
I can only speak as I find. My Octavia was in & out of the workshop several times with EGR faults, and smelled like an oily rag when faulty. It was eventually cured in the traditional VW manor of changing the software!
I never fully fell in love with that engine, and have gone back to petrol this time.
What year was the Octavia? Was it 2.0 or 1.9 TDI ? Because the previous engine the EA189 was the first CR after the unseccesful PD system. The PD system using so called pumpe-duse was more fuel efficient and greener due to higher injector pressure (250 bar) but was faulty and the engines didn't last longer than about 3-4 years, so VW frenzied the EA189 into production whiched used industry standard Common-Rail type of injection. It's a very proven system but less fuel efficient and due to lower injector pressures (160 bar) causes more NOx. Because previous diesel engines didn't have the SCR catalyst, the EGR was working overtimes to reduce NOx emissions. Shouldn't be a problem with the EA288, but you never know so fingers crossed :). In 2015 VW AG got a nice spanking so i hope that sticks for some time (all car manufacturers need that from time to time to remind them not to be naughty).

The other problem for the EGR is the DPF. If the DPF (Diesel Particulates Filter) is dirty (don't know if the previous cars have self cleaning DPF) the gases saturated with PM10 (black smoke from the exhaust) from the exhaust are diverted throught the EGR into the combustion chamber, which can clog up the EGR and force it open. This makes for a rought engine idle and smelly exhaust gases. Personaly i would never design an engine that diverts exhaust gases into the combustion chamber, but hey what do i know i'm not german.

This will be the first diesel engined car for me so hoping for the best out of zie germans.
 

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Brown-bear - my Octavia was a 2.0 manual 4x4. Great car actually apart from the EGR problems. I took delivery January 2014.
Yes, when playing-up the idle was rough, and accelerating when cold rattled like a petrol engine pinking. Quite amusing!

It went into self-cleaning mode quite often, with fan running after shut-down. I drove it quite hard and tried to keep revs above 2,000rpm to stop it sooting up, which was not totally successful obviously.
During one of the visits to workshop (under warrantee) they took the EGR valve off and cleaned it. The tech told me it "badly needed it"
I'm sure lessons have been learned in the past 3 years.
 

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Really useful information there - thank you.
 

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Useful info but where did you find it?

I ask because certain things are not necessarily the same everywhere, the DPF for example will not get changed unless you ask for it (same as DSG / Haldex oil changes) in the UK.
 

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Gizmo68 said:
Useful info but where did you find it?

I ask because certain things are not necessarily the same everywhere, the DPF for example will not get changed unless you ask for it (same as DSG / Haldex oil changes) in the UK.
Sometimes priorities seem a bit puzzling to me.
They seem very keen to recommend changing the poxy pollen filter, but don't mention drive train oil & filters. Easy Money, or am I just cynical?...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Gizmo68 said:
Useful info but where did you find it?

I ask because certain things are not necessarily the same everywhere, the DPF for example will not get changed unless you ask for it (same as DSG / Haldex oil changes) in the UK.
I use the data i have found on the internet and from my own personal knowledge.

Why change the oil in Haldex and DSG?
Both Haldex and DSG use clutch packs which, when they slip, they "rub-off" material. In DSG this will get collected by the oil filter, until it's too clogged to perform it's duty, When this happens, oil will be saturated with particulates and will slowly lose it's lubracating and cooling properties, which in therm will cause greater clutch wear.
Haldex clutch pack is less stressed so it doesn't lose so much clutch material and it doesn't need an oil filter. All that clutch material is collected in the oil which in term will cause it to have different properties which may lead to decreased functionality of the 4x4.

Normal oil change for a torque convertor is 70k - 120k miles, which only use unstressed clutch packs in the transmission planetary gear system. From that i have done an estimate that the DSG oil and filter should be replaced at 70k or 6 years.
For the Haldex i have found from multiple sources that oil change is needed every 3 years. They have even mentioned on their official website, that because the 5th Gen doesn't need an oil filter, the oil change is cheaper. Like i said, because there is no filter, the oil must be replaced more regularly.

There is no such thing as a "sealed for life" or "lifetime part". Zie germans have calculated that your car will do about 150k miles or 8 years, after that it will be a write-off. All the "lifetime" parts will last you that long, but from a mechanical point of view, if you want your car to be healthy all the time until offourse the electronics fail which is about at 15-20 years or 300k miles, you will change the oils and filters. The dealer certanly won't because if your Haldex or DSG fails it's your fault not theirs after 3 years in the UK (unless you have extended warranty) and a new clutch pack for the DSG is around 2000€ and for the Haldex about 500€.

At the end is your decision what you do with your car, what i have written are my observations and recomendations, which still are:
"To keep a woman or a maschine happy, parts in contact must be properly lubrecated."
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Gizmo68 said:
Useful info but where did you find it?

I ask because certain things are not necessarily the same everywhere, the DPF for example will not get changed unless you ask for it (same as DSG / Haldex oil changes) in the UK.
Yeah, I have made a mistake there and properly EDITED my post. TY for noticing.
 

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Great post.....many thanks for taking the time to share this info. 👍
 

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Seems that the Kodiaq 4X4's generally have a 96/4 torque slip according to Skoda NZ press sheet

 

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I'd love to know HOW this system works.
I understand that some of the "power distribution" is achieved by applying brakes to wheels which are not achieving traction, so power goes elsewhere.
I've also been told that under some circumstances when cornering the inside wheels are braked to increase power to the outside wheels.
In bottom right-hand diagram above, I assume the system can send 85% power to the rear left-hand wheel if required?
 
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