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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can the 4wd be switched to 2wd Or is it permanently 4wd ?
If it is stuck why isn't there a 2wd manual engine?

Professor
 

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Answer to first question, NO, it is the 'HALDEX ' system whereby all cars so fitted (which include Honda SUV and others) are 2WD all the time, UNLESS either of the front wheels starts spinning. If this happens the Haldex system will bring in the rear wheels to give better traction. So it's true description is 'part time 4WD'.
Q2 Sorry don't know. You will have to ask Skoda Customer Service, 03330037504
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Colin Lambert said:
Answer to first question, NO, it is the 'HALDEX ' system whereby all cars so fitted (which include Honda SUV and others) are 2WD all the time, UNLESS either of the front wheels starts spinning. If this happens the Haldex system will bring in the rear wheels to give better traction. So it's true description is 'part time 4WD'.
Q2 Sorry don't know. You will have to ask Skoda Customer Service, 03330037504
Thanks for the detailed reply
So in effect it is 2wd unless 4wd is needed so on decent roads you should get 2wd fuel economy except for the extra weight required for its 4wd capability
 

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The Haldex system is the best of both worlds for most people especially when fitted to a soft-roader.

2WD for 99% of the time with the rear wheel taking up the drive as and when needed, no it's not a 'true' 4x4 but then most of the time a4x4 is not needed anyway unless you are off road.

I believe it can be disconnected by pulling a fuse, not something I would be doing though.
 

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I agree with Romanv......everything I've seen says it's typically a 90:10 distribution as standard and the maximum it can give to any single axle is 90% so it will vary from 90% front / 10% rear up to (in extreme cases) 10% front / 90% rear.
 

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Unless Skoda have changed the Haldex system since the Yeti it is 'on demand'. As far as I am aware. I would be interested to see any info that says it is 90/10. If it has been seen in any motoring press articles, I would take their technical comments with a pinch of salt. They are know to have many incorrect statements.
Haldex has always been an on demand system, but that doesn't mean Skoda haven't changed something. They may, for example, have altered the sytem for Countries that have more snow & or worse roads than we have in the U.K.
The other thing to remember (whoever is correct about the split) is that even if it on on demand there is alway the rear diff , propshaft and output shaft of the Haldex 'bit' that, in 2WD will have to be turned by the rear wheels rather than the the wheels BEING turned. This, therefore, will use more fuel whether it is in 4 or 2 WD.
Skoda have yet to wake up to the fact they have a4X4 Kodiaq. this is for the NEW Octavia. So one can safely assume it is the same in the Kodiaq.Intelligent All-Wheel Drive
With its intelligent four-wheel drive system, the Octavia Estate gives you great stability, safety and traction in all sorts of driving conditions. The drivetrain with a 5th generation electro-hydraulic clutch reacts to just the slightest change under your wheels. In normal conditions, the car is like a regular two-wheel drive car. Let there be snow, rain, mud, and ice and the Octavia Estate's 4x4 ability kicks in automatically.
 

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I'm speaking from hear-say, but I thought Škoda 4x4 is on demand, engaging when front wheels lose traction, OR -
By pushing the Off-road button, which turns it on below 40 mph.

Any clarification would be great, because I WILL be using it.
 

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Note the blue quote above from the SUK website.

Off road button on the Yeti is. Again from SUK web site.

<COLOR color="#0000FF">Off-road button
By pushing the off road button, the Yeti Outdoor helps maintain control when the driving conditions get tough. It will maintain a constant speed downhill on a steep slope (over 8%), maintain traction going uphill and stop over revving of the engine, hold the car still on a hill start and help prevent the wheels from spinning on loose surfaces or wet, slippery roads.
</COLOR>
 

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Hello Sprower,
Neither am I, just years of being a member of Yeti Owners Club.
I think we will have to ask Mr Brown Bear where the information came from.
If the Octavia uses the 5th generation Haldex sytem (see above) and the Kodiaq also use the 5th generation, we should assume that they are both the same.
The piece I posted above says that ....In normal conditions, the car is like a regular two-wheel drive car. Let there be snow, rain, mud, and ice and the Octavia Estate's 4x4 ability kicks in automatically.
Which to my mind says it is 2wd only until slippage occurs on either of the front wheels.
If we can't resolve this, then someone who has 4WD needs to ask SUK.
I am only 2WD so it matters not a jot or tittle to me. Just interested in all thing mechanical. Quite happy to be proved wrong, but my flabber will be ghasted if I am ! :lol:
 

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https://www.pistonheads.com/news/features/haldex--the-truth/31854

'The current fifth-gen Haldex can sends about 10-15 per cent of power to the rear in normal driving and more when the fronts slip. How much more is a matter of debate. Not more than 50 per cent is generally agreed, although Ford claims 70 per cent for its new Focus RS (not confirmed as Haldex, but likely). All Haldex will say is that it depends on the customer.'

First Haldex generations were reactive, now they are proactive.
 

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It must be 90/10 or similar otherwise how can you justify the increased MPG and emissions of the 4x4 vs the 2x4?
Additional Weight alone?

As a thought, having 4x4 advertised in the boot/back of the car is misleading but I can understand it contributes to the hype factor.
It should have AWD in all fairness.
 

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Take a look at www.awdwiki.com
Explains different 4 wheel drive systems.
 

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Thanks Kodiaq DNA
On that web site you have these. If you click on Kodiaq it takes you to the second page pasted below..

http://www.awdwiki.com/en/skoda/#Skoda_Kodiaq__2016_

Edit
Skoda Fabia S2000
Skoda Kodiaq (2016-...)<COLOR color="#FF0000"><<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
Skoda Octavia A4 4x4
Skoda Octavia A5 Combi 4x4, Scout (2005-2009)
Skoda Octavia A5 Combi 4x4, Scout Facelift (2009-...)
Skoda Yeti (2009-...)
Skoda Fabia S2000

Figure: skoda fabia wrc
skoda-fabia-wrc
Do you think this information about Skoda Fabia S2000 is incomplete? Please send us what you know to or leave a comment below.

Skoda Kodiaq (2016-...)

Haldex Generation V automatic all wheel drive.<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Have you seen a better description of Skoda Kodiaq (2016-...) on the web? Please send us the link to or post it in a comment below!

All Wheel Drive Explained (Čeština, Deutsch, English, Polski, Русский)

Last changed: 2017/02/01 15:40 / History Edit
Understanding All Wheel Drive Systems
Part-Time All Wheel Drive
Full-Time All Wheel Drive
Automatic All Wheel Drive
Selectable All Wheel Drive
Understanding All Wheel Drive Systems

Why is it important to know how all wheel drive works on your car? First, it may appear that its all wheel drive system is not meant to be used on a road. For example, part-time all wheel drive cannot be used in non-slippery conditions - you'll have to drive such car in rear wheel drive mode, even when it is raining or snowing - in the weather conditions where all wheel drive might be needed. Second, depending on the type of all wheel drive, your car behaves differently when driving and cornering in slippery conditions. You might want to know what to expect.

Don't get confused by abbreviations that manufacturers use: "AWD" is not necessarily a full-time all wheel drive, "4WD" is not just for off-road vehicles. There is a dozen of brands car manufacturers are using to distinguish their four-wheel drive vehicles - "quattro", "4motion", and so on. However, these rarely indicate the type of all wheel drive system that is used on a particular vehicle.

In fact, just four types of all wheel drive systems exist:

Part-time all wheel drive
Full-time all wheel drive
Automatic all wheel drive<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
Selectable all wheel drive
Note: On this web site, when we describe details of the all wheel drive system used on a particular vehicle, we use the definitions that are listed here.

Part-Time All Wheel Drive

This is a "temporary" all wheel drive system. In normal driving conditions, just one axle (the rear axle normally) is driven. In slippery conditions, another axle is engaged by the driver, whether by a lever or a button. This type of all wheel drive does not have a center differential - when all wheel drive is engaged, the front and rear driveshafts are mechanically connected and rotate at the same speed.

When a vehicle is turning, front wheels travel greater distance than rear wheels.

Figure: Wheels rotate with different speeds and travel different distances when vehicle is turning
part-time-all-wheel-drive-windup
Because part-time all wheel drive system does not have a center differential, front wheels cannot go faster than rear wheels. This type of all wheel drive cannot be used on pavement. Turning on pavement (even on a wet pavement) with all wheel drive engaged causes transmission windup and increases the chances of the transmission breakdown. When all wheel drive is engaged, the vehicle heavily understeers and this can lead to an accident.

The all wheel drive mode on a vehicle with part-time all wheel drive should only be used on surfaces with low traction (mud, snow, ice, sand), for short periods, and at low speeds. When driving on such surfaces, the transmission windup is eliminated by slipping of the wheels.

Note: "Part-time 4wd" mode of the Jeep Cherokee's SelecTrac transmission means "locking of center differential". Jeep's SelecTrac is a selectable all wheel drive system.

Full-Time All Wheel Drive

This is a permanent all wheel drive or permanently engaged all wheel drive system. All wheels are powered at all times. The vehicles with full-time all wheel drive are equipped with a center differential that lets each wheel travel different distances while turning. This type of all wheel drive can be used both on and off road. In slippery conditions, the center differential can be locked, whether manually or automatically, depending on the vehicle.

When a manual center differential lock (available on off-road vehicles and some SUVs) is engaged, the transmission's behavior is similar to part-time all wheel drive, i.e. the front and rear driveshafts rotate at the same speed. The use of full-time all wheel drive with locked center differential is limited to surfaces with low traction.

In case of automatic lock, a Torsen differential, viscous coupling, multi-plate hydraulic clutch, or similar traction control device is used in conjunction with the center differential. When a wheel slips on one of the axles (one driveshaft rotates faster than the other) the device locks the center differential and torque is transferred from the axle that slips to the other axle that has traction. As soon as the wheel slip is eliminated, the device unlocks.

Some vehicles (Land Rover Discovery II, pre-xDrive BMW X5) do not have a locking center differential, but are equipped with an electronic traction control system (known as Electronic Differential Lock - EDL) on all four wheels. This electronic system detects slipping wheels by reading ABS sensors, then it applies brakes to slipping wheels and torque gets transferred to the wheels that have traction. While it performs well on slippery roads, the system cannot compete with a real mechanically locking differential when driving off-road.

Automatic All Wheel Drive

This is an "on-demand" all wheel drive system. Under normal driving conditions, only one axle is powered. When wheel slipping occurs (the driving driveshaft rotates faster than the driven driveshaft), a multiplate hydraulic clutch, viscous coupling, or other similar traction control device locks and engages another axle. Torque gets transferred to another axle. As soon as difference in front and rear axle speeds is eliminated, the device unlocks and the vehicle goes back into two-wheel drive mode.

The difference between the traction devices that are used in full-time all wheel drive and automatic all wheel drive systems is that the device used in automatic all wheel drive system replaces the center differential.

Advanced electronically controlled all wheel drive systems can be proactive and lock the traction control device even before wheels start to slip - the need for all wheel drive is determined in real time, based on the information that is collected from various sensors (i.e. g-force sensor, accelerator pedal position, etc.).

Some vehicles let the driver to lock the multiplate hydraulic clutch manually when the driver feels that he needs all wheel drive engaged permanently, for example to drive off road. For example, in Nissan X-Trail, this is accomplished by pressing a button on the dashboard console. In Subaru Legacy, the clutch is locked when the automatic transmission gear shift lever is at the position "1".

A known problem with multiplate k hydraulic clutches that are used in automatic all wheel drive systems is traction device overheating. For example, this can occur with some compact SUVs when they are driven off-road, through a thick layer of snow, etc. ECU detects overheating, disengages the clutch, and puts the vehicle into 2WD mode. A warning light is displayed on the instrument panel.
</COLOR>
 

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Explain please. how do you know it's in AWD from standstill?
 

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Candywhite said:
It also is 4x4 when starting from standstill.
I have experienced the rear axle engaging when starting briskly on a wet road. It came in with a subtle thump, which makes me think it ISN'T usually engaged from standstill.
 

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The Haldex system can transfer UP TO 85% of power TO ANY WHEEL.

Normal driving conditions it's 90/10 and every wheel must have at least 5% of power AT ALL TIMES for dynamic stability. It's an AWD system and it CAN'T be turned off. The 5th gen Haldex doesn't require slip to transfer power/torque due to electro-hydraulic motor that always has the system primed. When accelerating, especialy at low speeds and from the stop, it will always transfer power to the rear axle (pro-active rather re-active) and i rain/snow conditions. To determine this it uses other build-in sensors of other systems (lights, ABS, speedometer, rev counter, etc).

The OFF-ROAD button is only a descend control, that automaticly brakes each wheel for a controled descend. It has NOTHING to do with accelerating or maintaining movement it's only a DESCEND CONTROL. http://www.skoda.co.nz/models/hotspotdetail?HotspotName=I4+-+Off-road+button&Page=interior&WebID=e9741374-c026-48a1-bcc1-7136e03f01ef

EDIT: Yeti had the 4th Gen HALDEX which wasn't as pro-active so there was some trouble with wheel spin at lower speeds, so the YETI off-road function included start assist. The KODIAQ has the 5th Gen HALDEX which automaticly sends torque to rear axle at lower speds and high revs and so the OFF-ROAD function/button is only used for descend (there is a nice tutorial on youtube for kodiaq but failed to find it again) - note the different button image defines the change of function. When you descend with the OFF-ROAD function on, you don't need to touch the transmission, brakes, clutch or throttle pedal.
 
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